Revenue Champions
Revenue Champions

Episode 71 · 1 month ago

71: Cold calling live #13 (with Jason Bay, Founder & CEO at Outbound Squad)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to our 13th episode of Revenue Champion’s Cold calling live, a cold calling series where top sales leaders go through live cold calls and give actionable insight and advice to how to overcome obstacles when cold calling. This week, Ryan Reisert, Subject Matter Expert @Cognism is joined by Jason Bay, Founder and CEO @Outbound Squad to discuss cold calling scripts. In this episode, Ryan and Jason evaluate cold calling scripts from our audience, giving live feedback and actionable takeaways so they can improve their cold calling techniques.

From everybody. We are back for another cold Calling Live. I guess that's what we call it here. Although this is not cold Coin Live, it's more about preparing for live cold conin and today I got a very special guest. I've shared this in the past, I'll share it again publicly with everybody. There's only a few folks in the industry that I really really, um really really uh stand behind when it comes to their approach and and focus to cold calling. We brought a few in the past, and today we've got another one. Mr Jason Bay, Welcome to the show. I'm glad to be here, man. It's always fun jamming with you. I feel like I'm I'm like talking to like you're like the mad scientist of of cold calling. I feel like, well, I do focus on I do focus on the data, you know, very data driven, and I use that to drive my decisions where a lot of other folks tend to be a little bit more subjective, you know. And what what these sessions are about, what I'm excited about in you on today is that there's lots of different ways to approach outbound. Everybody has um their own best practices and approaches and and of course, what I like to do is is learn about them and bring them to the world. I try them all myself. And as I've said over and over and over on this live show that it's about trying to find something that you're confident with and then being consistent over time. And when you have that consistency and confidence, you can then start to get the data we're talking about to inform hey, is this working or not? And is it me or is it the approach? And without that consistency and confidence, we're kind of out there scrambling. And so today for today's show, for those that are tuning in, we've got kind of three sections. First of all, if you're tuning in live, let us know where you're coming in front. Let's have you have some folks coming from Poland and Stockholm and Greenland and Seattle and Cape Town, South Africa. Look at all those continents even being represented here we go. Let us know where you're calling in from, coming in from. And today we got Jason is going to share a little bit about his approach to the top of the funnel, specifically cold calling. Um, all of you that are in here are gonna love his ideas around some unique ways to open a conversation as well as that transition statement. So he has a really great approach that's a little bit different than what we shared before. So take out your pens and pencils, write those down. You're gonna want to take your notes today. Uh, and then we're gonna bring on some guests as always to get some pitch feedback. So if anyone wants to be a victim I mean a volunteer to some feedback, we've got Jason here to kind of hear your approach to a cold call and get some some live coaching, and then we'll open it up for Q and A. So if you have questions throughout the show, make sure to chat him. Tim will capture those and we'll leave the second or the last part of the show today to try to answer those live for you all. So, without further Adoe Jason. For those that don't know you, first of all, who is Jason Bay. Yeah, it's a deep question. We could take them a lot of goals, uh, But the part that people actually want to hear. I run a company called Outbound Squad uh where we have a mission to help sales reps and sales teams turn complete strangers into paying customers. So my entire career starting from nineteen years old running a house painting business and having to go door to door to sell those two working in call centers and and running and building call centers to now in the last six or seven years more specifically tech. I love helping people with outbound It's uh one of the things that I think a lot of reps were tasked to do this thing and not really given much more direction than hey, maybe here's a script or a couple of email templates like get after a dude, you know kind of thing. So what I really want to help folks do is relieve some of the anxiety that we have around this. And you use the word confidence earlier, which I really like that word. I think having a process, a very simple process with a few steps, Like there's confidence that has gained from just going into the gym, you know, so to speak, and knowing what the workout routine...

...is going to be. So that's what I really love to help reps with. Amazing and and as you heard here, Jason has the real cold calling experience. For those of you don't understand what cold collen used to be, it is the old door knocking. You talked to some old schoolers. When you say cold calling, they think cold calling his door knocking all the way up to the inside sales call center experience, which is very different than some of the modernist they are world. Right, you're given a lot of the freedom and flexibility that we hear today. Um and UH. And now he's working with lots of organizations, individuals and teams. Is that right, Jason? Your program is for teams and individuals. Yep. Yeah. I work where sales teams that you know, companies like Gong or a Medalia UM, and then all the way down to individual reps working at S and b s doing enterprise and kind of everywhere in between. UH. And the sort of the the approach and the mindset sort of behind this is that, UH, I work with individuals and companies that believe in being proactive about filling their pipeline. And I think as we start to head into a recession, at least here in the United States, I don't know what the rest of the world's looking like. UM. The ability to proactively fill your pipeline, whether you're an str obviously that's a job that you're being tasked to do full time, but account executives too. I mean, there's a lot of really great data around there around just what percentage of pipeline should you be self sourcing if you want to hit and surpass your quota, And it's depending on where you look. Somewhere between this outbound skill and being able to over the phone be able to convert more than three or five percent of people you talk to into a qualified meeting is really where it's at, you know. I mean, you're all about helping people with your phone ready leads, get people more people to pick up the calls. And it's also a game as an account executive or any other full cycle sales rep with the limited number of conversations you are going to have, how and I convert more of them, you know, into meetings or at least not lose ones that I that you lost because you didn't run an effective call. So that's what we're going to dig into today. But I think it's just super super important right now to be on top of, like the skill part, how can we go from three to our live conversations converting into a meeting to upwards of which is totally possible if you're going after good fit prospects and you have a really good message. I love that. And that's where we align so well. Uh, target message, channel, timing, right and the first two things that you just hit on, right, are you targeting the right people? Are you saying the right things? And today and this whole show is around Okay, let's assume that we're all pretty good at getting a list together. We know we know that UM whether an STRNA that's responsible for proactively filling our pipelines. We've got some folks that we want to talk to you. Now what do we say? And man, I, if you think three is okay and Jason saying it's possible to get to potentially thirty percent, what would that do? That's huge, right that At five percent, that's one out of twenty conversations. At thirty percent, that's one out of three, you know, and if some of you are struggling to even get that conversation. That's the difference between a couple of meetings a week versus a couple of meetings a month if you're lucky. And so let's double click into there, Jason, because you've got two things that I think are really exciting. One is UM the way that you are talking and teaching about just starting that conversation, right, So we do all this work and we get limited number of connects and maybe uh those those fall off before we even get to our pitch, and so you have an approach there, and then the second part of Jason's conversation today is going to be Okay, let's we've gotten past hello, what do we do next? How do we actually effectively communicate the reason for the conversation? And so I'm not sure which one you want to start with here, Jason, but can you walk us through your approaches here today? Yeah? Definitely. I think if...

...you get to prompt the audience with a question, um, and my is it? Okay? If I mentioned other like data from other vendors not competing with cognism necessarily like a chorus, But I have no data and I don't think cognizance does either, Okay, I don't want to get you in trouble, dude. So um, Chorus AI conversational intelligence software. They have some really good data on the average length of a cold call. Let me know in the chat, what do you guys think the average length is of the tens of thousands of cold calls that people have made through their system and the data. Let me know in the chat, how many seconds do you think the average cold call lasts? And we'll see what the kind of rangers dude, we're gonna need to get you on here. Yes, so kind of all over the place. So they took the average length of the recording and it was about eighty seconds. So that's in looting the dial time, right, so we could assume it's somewhere probably around and where people tend to get shut down is in that very like prospect picked up hope, Shoot, what do I say? Like that little back and forth right there, that's where the cold call is really like you either bought yourself some time or you got immediately shut down. That's where most people run into trouble. So in that first little part, I break up the call into an intro is the first part that first sixty seconds. There's a hook in the middle, and then there's a close at the end. We're gonna probably spend a lot of our time on that intro piece because it's really important. So in the intro, my goal is to make an entrance, so just like entering a party or anything like that, or an event or going over to a small group get together, whatever it might be. I want to make a really good first impression, so a way that we can kind of think about this as I always want to reverse engineer. Let me ask you, Ryan, do you ever pick up cold calls on purpose? What I can? Yeah? Absolutely, yeah, So when you can, you might be one of those rare exceptions of people because you're probably like me and that you're kind of fascinated with what other people might say, and you respect the craft all the other stuff. I think we could we could agree. Let me know if anyone here in the chat disagrees that your prospect probably didn't pick up the call on purpose, thinking it was a salesperson, and then like they were really eager to hear what you said, that's right, Probably a net agrees Tom said is true. So since they didn't pick up the call on purpose, we have to immediately add context to the conversation and differentiate from what the typical experience might be like. So, if we think about who is going to be calling these people, most of the time it people pick up an a known number because they think it's an emergency. Someone at their school, kids school, They might think it's an internal thing. There's all kinds of stuff going on. I want to immediately add context to my intro, and I'm going to do three things. They don't necessarily have to be in this order. I want to gain permission, so some sort of permission based to open or introduce myself gain permission. I want to add something relevant to the conversation. That relevance. I want to be about that individual or about that company. Show this person that I did my research. I called you on purpose. You weren't just on a big list. I was dialing through. I called you on purpose. And then we're gonna leverage what's called a priority drop. So our priority or drop is sort of the reverse pitch. So again, if I'm going to reverse engineer this and think about what the user experience is like being on the receiving end of a cold call. Most of the time people pick up and say, Hey, Ryan, it's Jason with X y Z company. How's it going, Yeah, why are you calling? Well, hey, I work with I run a company called Outbound Squad, and we do sales training with other SaaS companies. We do Actually, like that's the typical experience of a cold call is like, immediately get pitched. We want to be the outlet of that. It's a pitch slap. Yeah. So the first thing that I would recommend is, especially when you're calling executives, the first sentence that comes out of your mouth. What you could do is...

...again that relevance piece that we talked about, So we talked about permission based, opener, relevance, priority, drop. I'm going to drop in something that is relevant to that individual. So I'll give you an example. I work with a company that sells a customer experience solution to fortune one thousand companies. A specific persona that they work with is customer support. These are people running huge contact centers and what they care about is reducing costs to serve. So how do we decrease the amount of our employees time and resources to serve each of our individual customers? So think of like a Comcast or an Exfinity thousands, hundreds of thousands of customers. How do we reduce the cost to serve? So in my research, I'm just looking for instances of them talking about stuff like that in their initiatives or something off through LinkedIn profile and that might sound something like this, Hey, Ryan, I was giving you a call because I noticed that you guys have an initiative just from your Q three report around reducing costs to serve. Oh. By the way, this is Jason with x y Z company. You've got a minute from me. Tell you why I'm calling you, open up about that person. You didn't even say your name. You're going right after the in this case, the research you've done around an initiative that they care about. Yep, And you could do that in reverse order if you like. So. I think the order of this is not necessarily as important as getting this stuff out. But what I've noticed just in the last six nine months of working with reps and doing this myself is that most of the time executives are pretty impatient on the phone. And I want to understand the reason for your call, and the reason for the call I'm going to make up about you. So think about what are the things that you find. It could be hiring Merger's acquisitions. It could be that you saw in this LinkedIn's profile. In the case of these customers support personas oftentimes they list out their accomplishments, how much money they've saved the company. You know what I mean, so any of that kind of stuff that you would normally personalize in the first line of an email. I just want you to open up without in your call. Hey, it's given you a call because I noticed this or about this, or you've listed out this priority. By the way, it's Jason with X y Z company. And then I go into the permission based element. Do you mind if I take a minute to share the reason for my call and you can let me know everyone and keep chatting. There's lots of variations of what you can do there, but we'll go ahead and pause there. Ryan, That's what I am a big fan of in that first fifteen seconds, and I think I think that it's it's really interesting that there's more and more data now to support this. A lot of times, h if you look at different approaches to uh, how you enter a call and what do you say next? Historically it's been based on how people feel. Now it's based on data. So the idea that the average conversation is only eighty seconds including dial time, which is probably closer to forty seconds, means that. And we talked about this several times. For those who have been here before, it's the pitch lab Hey, this is Ryan blah bla blah blah. You don't give a break, You just keep going. It sounds like an auctioneer. And it's a lat right, like they're just waiting to say no thanks click versus finding in a way to break up the pattern and and begin a two way dialogue. And what I like about what you're saying right now is the way your framework works is very in line with how Towns and Ward laws article calling. I love his framework too. Um very different, but it's intentional. You're saying to the same things, but with some psychology baked in, which is this is interruptive communication. Right This idea that someone's calling because there they believe like they're ready to talk to you is is false right there, it's interruptive communication. All the reasons you listed are likely why they picked up, not because they thought it was a salesperson. They wanted to talk to you. And so how do you get that relevance? Woodward calls it relevant clarity, and in this case, it's it's for you. It's gaining gaining um that relevance right off the gate and a unique way is really interesting. And I like the idea that you can hiat two initiative that they should it should trigger right?...

Oh wow, this is different. Nobody has entered a conversation with some specific information that would likely be relevant for me. M my question. Then here Jason becomes that this is this is primarily and guessing just based on your approach as well from the beginning. But this this is a very targeted primarily towards the executives, right, because those are the ones that are gonna care more about some sort of public information about you know, an initiative that that was published on maybe there their website or a newsletter or something like that. Right, So do you do you do you actually prospect at all below the power line? Or is it is your approach mostly to those folks that care the most? Yeah, definitely, this is a great question. So and I'll answer some of the questions in the chat two people are asking should you ask how the person is doing? So I'll get to answer that question too. If you're doing enterprise or strat or even large commercial type of sales motions, there's gonna be a lot of information on these companies, right, so you're not there's the amount of companies the volume is like reduced, so I have more time. It makes more it makes more sense to spend that time to do that kind of stuff. Okay, so below the line or on the line, so directors you know, for example, or someone that's ahead of something, Um, yeah, they're totally worth calling. The way that I can add relevance to that conversation is more through the second part of the call. So maybe I'm just gonna say, hey, Ryan, noticed that you head up the sales development team at x y Z company. Oh, by the way, it's Jason without bound squad. You get a mane for me to tell you the reason for my call, and I can go in from there. So call out a job title, something about them. It could be really really simple. So those below the line folks, it's not gonna You're not going to spend a ton of time researching these people because that meeting is not as valuable to you as with a VP, let's say, or a senior vice president of something. So the next part that should I ask them how they're doing? I mean going actually has a lot of data around the how have you been question? So I just get a vibe, like if the person sounds like there's someone that's like when they say hello, what kind of mental state do they sound like they're in? If it's like hello, yeah, hey is Jason? You know? If they sound really impatient, I'm just going to get to the point. If they sound like someone that's friendly or willing to talk and engage, then I'll do the hate. Ryan was giving you a call about the initiative x y Z By the way, it's Jason with x y Z company. How have you been? That question? There's a ton of data the supports asking that question, and this is a style and preference thing. Yep, how have you been? They tested variants of that against how are you doing? How's your day going? And they found that the how have you been is more like what a friend would ask. And if you can do it in that tone that I did just now too, the prospect is going to think, for a second, do I know this person? Right? So I'm trying to get the prospect in this mode of I'm active listening now, I'm not multitasking anymore. You caught me when I was doing email or doing something else, like I am actively participating in this conversation. I think that the permission based opener or just the intro component of it goes right back to this is about finding something that you're comfortable with and and being more consistent versus like the actual phraseology. Right. So, yeah, there's data that shows some of these things may work better than others. But at the end of the day, if you can't deliver it with confidence and your tonalities off your flat versus the way you're supposed to present in a conversational voice, nothing's going to matter. And so you know, when when you're asking these types of questions, um, you know, for me, I would say try it yourself and see what see if it lands. You know, if if if it feels good, you're going to be a lot more successful than if it doesn't. If it doesn't...

...feel natural, you're gonna have a really hard time having that conversation. Into Jason's point, every individual is not the same either, so it can work for some people and may not work for others. The real trick here is if you get shut down. This is a real trick on this second. If you're getting shut down with whatever approach it is, then wait a couple of days and call back with something different, And that's where you're going to really see success because that individual from time to time might even open up differently. They were flat one day and a little bit more friendly the next day, and so you just don't know. Um, that's that's the power the follow up. So with the interest of time here, Jason, I wanted to transition into your concept of the priority drop. What is that you said? It was like kind of reverse pitching. Yeah, walks through, he walks through. What that means? Yeah, so we do permission based opener and Ryan says, yeah, go ahead, Do you got the floor? Why you call him? What comes out of your mouth next? Do not? I urge you to not pitch during this time because you're you're basically when you pitch, you're giving the opportunity of prospect, the opportunity to decide whether or not they need your product or service, and a cold call is not the place to for them to decide that. There's not enough information or context for them. So really, what I want to do is get a gauge of what they're working on so that I can cater and tailor my value prop to something specific, versus saying we do sales training, you know. So what I want to do here with the priority drop is I don't want to go and really heavy with we help people who are having these problems because I don't know about you, Ryan. I don't really open up to people I don't know about all my business problems, you know what I mean, That's not something that I open up about. So the priority drop is people are wanting to do these things, accomplish these things, but run into these things. So an example of that, we talked about the vps of customer support. Uh, these folks run in contact centers. So this is what it's going to sound like. Um So Ryan says, yeah, go ahead, what's the reason for your call? Well, hey, Ryan, appreciate it. First off, in speaking with vps of customers support at companies like Comcast and few other hility is similar to yours. We here Typically here focus around two things. One is around reducing costs to serve, so figuring out ways to reduce call center volume and get customers to self serve on the digital channels and PDF that looks like you guys have on your website. Or Two, it's more around agent attrition, So how do we get agents the tools, all of the stuff that they need to help customers and reduce first call resolution so they can do their job and feel good about what they're doing. I'm really curious, are either two of those remotely close to what you're focused on right now or is it something else altogether. So I'm gonna be super specific. I'm going to think about if you're an str and bd R, I'm going to think about when my account executive hops on that first call and goes through demo with the prospect, what are the big things that these people share that they're working on, Like, what are the overarching priorities, the things that are like a three initiative? And then what's something that tends to get in the way of that? And if you are an account executive or a full cycle sales rep, use the stuff that you learn in the sales motion to inform your outbound messaging. So really think about and a question you should be asking in that sales call is, hey, Ryan, before we dig in today, if you don't mind sharing what what big goals are initiatives do you have over the next six to twelve months that are related to the conversation that we're gonna have today, So I could make sure this is a good use of your time and we're gonna write down word for word what these people say, or listen back to the call recordings or whatever it might be. But I want to incorporate those high level things. And this allows me to filter the conversation because when we hopped on the cold call, there's like a massive amount of things that we could cover that's like this big and talk about, and I want to immediately add context and like pick this little window of stuff to to talk about that they're going to care about. So that's the concept of the priority drop is how can I filter this conversation, put up some bumper guards, really focus it and make it very narrow, and also talk about something that they're working on. And so what I like about this,...

...uh S Sandler hasn't a version of this where they basically are you know folks that I talked to. They tend to say they have these types of problems or if not that this way or if not that way. The way you've framed the priority jobs is is it always too and then opening up a third that's like, or is there something else so that you're capturing that information? Is that by design? Or is there a magic number of more than two two initiatives is always two and then or something else? Is that is that the framework I like to or something else just because it's short and snappy. Gong has got some really interesting data around this too, around monologues and cold calls, and what they found is that cold calls with positive outcomes, they do have monologues in them that are like around thirty seconds. So it's okay to monologue. But once I start to get past thirty five seconds, I mean, I'm just like talking at this person, and I find that when we have three, it can go on to sixty seconds or so, oh yeah out, I mean, so I want to keep it around. If you listen to the if you listen to the Cold Call Live, the Sandler folks do love those guys. They do the live Cool Calling show with with My channel every week. It gets pretty long, sometimes like all right, what's going on? But it's by design, right. The idea is to to like really be different and and try to help hit on something. But two with and or something else to be more conversational feels pretty good. And if you you know your advice of actually going in and getting feedback from the actual sales conversations and bringing that into the cold call more people more often than not, people that you're serving want to know what other people are also focused on too, What are how do I relate to my peers? How do I measure up? You know? So, so is there a way to present that where you know, we're speaking with folks like you or what was the phraseology used? Exactly? Because it's it's a little bit different. Um, yeah, already dropped. Hey, in conversations with other vee pees of support like yourself at companies like X and Y, I'm gonna throw in some social proof right there. Or you could say, in our work with heads of customer support at companies like A and B. So think about social proof that you can dump out. And I want to double click on what you said, Ryan, Around people want to know what others are working on. That's called an insight, So you have insights to share. So it's at at what I've heard this referred to as is a customer voice. I really like that, Like I'm going to speak through the lens of my customer. Yeah, you know, I'm going to speak through what these people are focused on and what we help. This is a way for you to talk about what you do without saying we help sell and sos with this and this and that, without doing this like along winded elevator pitch. Yeah. I love that. I mean it's a slight nuance, but it makes a big difference in terms of getting back to what we're dealing with right now. From the very beginning interruptive communication. I don't know who you are. Why are you calling me? The first place? You set some relevance, some context. Okay, this person took some time. Now you've got a shot. But instead of me just pitch lapping, great, here's what we do specifically for you, which I don't really know yet, instead you're you're taking a step back and saying, you know, here's other folks like you, and there's the initiatives. Is that on point? Or is there something else? And now you're back to like you're gonna get a yes on one of those which you can dive deeper into or something else, and you're gonna listen and and determine is is it aligned? It may or may not be, But now you're gathering information necessary to inform the next best action into the conversation. So this is this is awesome. I don't know um, you know, getting into the second part of the section here. But Jason, I know you have lots of content around this. UM, I'm guessing you've probably shared some examples of this in the past. Maybe people can look them up if folks want to do a little bit more research on priority drop. I know...

...you and I did a live show before too, probably dig up the show notes. But is there is there a resource center where folks could learn a little bit more if they want to dive deeper into there you go already in the chat. In the chat, the first page is got like our best content on it for LinkedIn posts. There's a cold calling section and they're specifically just poke around at some of that stuff. You can see some some good examples. Amazing alright, So again, if you have questions as well, keep chatting them there. Tim, we'll try to uh, we'll try to address us at the end of it. But now we want to transition into bringing on some folks on stage. If anyone wants to volunteer to walk us through how they're handling their cool calls today and we'll go through some um, some pitch feedback. We'll probably have time for two or three folks Julie, welcome to the show. Where are you calling him from? I'm going from Stockholm? Stockholm? Wow, alright, what time is it over there? Is it like us? Okay, so perfect time to be cool calling What are you doing on a show? You should be making calls to the exacts, right, yes? Well, so to set some contexts for for our feedback today, Julie, who who do you serve? Who are you trying to reach out to? And what do you what do you offer as a as a as an organization. Just set some context for us and the audience and then we'll we'll go through a little bit of a role play. Yep. So I'm a video artam video art team leader and our mainly prospect enterprise companies everywhere in Europe, and we sell electric signatures and authentication, which is the way way to verify the identity of signatories. Okay, perfect? And generally, who is your target an actual individual that you might be reaching out to you for the purposes of culture. Yeah, it's a quite it's quite a large topic, AT's say, because we have dialogue with legal department, i T department, sales departments. So yeah, it's a detective work for me. To locate to find the right person, I would say, okay, so um, for the purposes of the exercise today, let's hone in on one that you might be struggling with. Which one which one of those audiences you got you got us on the phone? Who? Who? Who? Generally would you like to try to practice with today? Yeah? I like I T people usually. Yeah, okay, so we're I T and you're gonna talk to us about identification electronic signatures. Fantastic, right, we'll get into it. So hey, this is Ryan. Hi, Hi, right, and good afternoon. You speaking to Judy and I'm calling from Scribe Scribe Yes, s c R I V. We are a company based in Stockholm and we specialize in East signing solution and authentication. I'm calling you because I would like to book a meeting with you, but first let me give you a bit of context. We work with a lot of companies in your industry and we help them to digitize the processes. So yeah, that's why I'm calling you. Would you have freeze out in the coming days? All right, let's stop there, thank you. So we know that this one isn't as live fire to stop stop, repeat. I don't know if you've been on those ones, Julie, but this is gonna be a little bit low, lower key. I just want to get through the messaging and we'll go back through after some coaching and give you another shot here. But how did that feel? Well? Nervous? Yeah, I don't blame you. It's making calls in front of everyone like this. Yeah, not that there's not not always so. Um So, Jason, what what did you think of Julie's approach today? So? I think, first off, love the town energy personality comes through all of that stuff is real, really good, So we definitely want to keep that up. I got a question for you, what is an I T person? What is a an outcome that this person is trying to accomplish in their job or a priority or goal initiative that they have, and then a coupled with a problem that they tend to run...

...into related to your solution. I'd said compliance security and also the fact, I mean I t director ahead of I. It doesn't want like a problems, so we need to make sure that buying our solution won't be a headache and it will be a smooth process. And also i'd say that, um, they need to understand quickly that it's not going to change their life, Like we have a list of integration and we can integrate very easily to the existing systems. Yeah. So one more question related to this, So if they're not using scribe, what are they doing right now? Is it just a docu sign type of situation? Like what's that? What do they do right now? Especially after COVID, Like most companies, they have a tune in place. Um, it's very rare, rare when people tells me like, yeah, no, we have we still have a manual process. We are a little bit old school. Is quite rare. So most of the prospect that I'm calling they already have a two in place. But you are mentioning documsign boo they are they are? Yes? Why do people why do people switch to your tool? Then? What what is not ideal for an I T person? What problems are created for this person if they're using a docky sign instead? Describe Well, our company was built so we are European company, built for the European market. So we have a legal expertise in the European market. Uh, and we we had a lot of customers that went from docums and or Adobe signed subscribe because of those reasons, because in the end, legal requirements are very important. So yeah, well it's yeah, I'm just realizing that it's not really i T topic now, it's like more illegal topic. But all of this stuff are linked. Yeah, both. Probably it s job to execute on the things that legal needs and to make sure it's that they're using software that's complying and all that kind of stuff. Right. So the reason I ask you this is that part was kind of missing from the first part of your call, and what I worry about. Do you get people saying we already have a solution? Yeah, all right, So if it's because you're talking about the solution. So when you talk about solutions, I think about as a prospect, do I have one of these? And the answer in your case is going to be yes every single time, probably, right, So I don't want to talk about the solution. I want to talk and I want to ease my way into that. Okay, So if we were to take that priority drop framework. I speak to a lot of i T folks and they tell me that one of the things that is really important to them is making sure the tools they use are compliant in the market, especially the European market. But what they run into with their current tools is that they're not really built for the European markets, so they tended to run into problems like A and B. I'm really curious which one of those have you run into? Or they tend to want to find solutions that to accomplish X and Y are either of these are priority for you right now? So I think you need to find a way to work some of that into your intro. Okay, so it's hey, Julie, uh, you know, nice to meet you. Whatever you said at the beginning, Like your intro was fine, there was a pause there that I would recommend like leaving out at the very beginning you said, hey, it's hey, it's Jason withoutbound squad. Don't pause there, but keep the conversation going. Go straight into the reason for my call. As I noticed that you head up, I t that so and so company and typically in speaking with people like you, and then I'm going to go into like what are they trying to accomplish? What kind of problems do they run into? And they just ask them if that's something that's top of mind for them right now. Okay, So what do you. What do you think that that might sound like for you? Yeah, yeah, I need to find very...

...precise arguments. What's what's gonna be the best arguments for the I T people? Is that security, is that compliance, is that its most process et cetera. Or is that features Because for example, we have our French as we can hear and in France we are less advanced. Uh. In Sweden, I feel that this is like a very modern society and we have tools provided by the government Bank e D. So it's um, it's an application on the fund and we we can authenticate ourselves to I don't know, websites, et cetera. So we don't have this in France. We have this in Sweden. So I know that our company, I mean scribe can really provide good tools for the European markets, so that can like features can also be important. Yeah, so that's my feedback. I would figure out how can I work some of the stuff into the intral I give you a couple of examples. But folks like you're typically focused on compliance and security and making sure that their tools are built for the region that they work in so they can do X y Z or avoid this problem or they're just looking for signature tools and things like that that are easier for their sales and legal team to do. That is also compliant, you know with GDPR or whatever the other kind of stuff has. Get that part into your call first and make the prospect ask you what what you're like, who where you're calling from, on what your product does. Don't start with your product. Okay, yeah, cool, so helpful. Yes, thank you so much. Is this meeting recorded? Are we going to receive the link? Yes, you'll so all of the previous shows are always on the same link that you signed up for. There's that on demand library, so this will be available and Tim will be emailing out as well, I believe after the show as well, so you can come back and get some notes from the show. Thank you so much for participating. Thank you. Let's get one more victim I mean, uh guests in here, and then we'll open up for Q and A if that works. Jason, that was great insight. I love about bringing on folks like you, just different different perspectives on things. So Charles the show, where are you calling from? I'm coming from sale Washington, Seattle, another washingtony in I'm in that Vancouver. Oh nice, that's awesome. Go. I grew up in Spokane myself, so downtown in California. So Charles, who are you calling in from? What company do you serve and who do you serve within the organization? So what does your company do and who do you serve? Yeah? I work for an str with c Interactive and we're a tech platform for real estate agents. So UM. We provide a website that's integrated with the NLS. We also provide UM digital ad services US in Google Ads and back in CRM. I think what makes Sierra stand up from our competitors is that we're the only real estate sas company that does all three. Most real estate agents will use several other platforms UM for these services for these solutions, but we kind of, you know, are three and one UM. So that's that's that's a kind of a nutshell. And so the people that I'm reaching out to our usually, like you know, the ideal size team of agents would be about five five users on a team. It's kind of smaller teams UM. I wouldn't be reaching out to enterprise teams. Uh. I think a smaller percentage of our clients are solo agents. But I think like the five to twenty would be like the uh kind of the ideal target audience for us. Okay, so, uh team of five to twenty real estate agents and you have an all on one marketing app right CRM advertising, so paper click advertising and uh data? Is that what I...

...heard? Yes? It would be like like the agent's websites. If you went to let's just say, like Brian Realty dot com, they have their listings, maybe like a buy of their team, um, a patriar, accolades, things like that. Okay, perfect, Let's go through a section here and then we'll give you some feedback. So, hey, this is Ryan Ryan real Estate. How can I help you? Uh? Hey, Jason, I saw that you're a real leary with Kelly Williams. This is Charlot to see interactive. Did you have five minutes for a quick chat about converting more leads to a closed deal. I'm actually just running into a showing here about how can I help? Okay, I'll leave it real quick. Um. I noticed that you have a katy Core website. When I talked to other agents who are also uson katy Core, it tells me it's not really delivering with quality leads. Um, and they're not really converting? Is that some familiar Uh? I mean I think they do. Okay, it's leads and conversions on me right, Uh? Partially, I mean it is I think you know, the to serve the platforms task to get to deliver those leads. How many leads are you uh converting each month? Oh? Just a handful? Hey, I got I gotta get going here, Charles. Do you wanna mind to send me send me some information. I'm gonna get to this showing here. Yeah. I would be more than happy to send you an email following this conversation. Um, do you think that you know you could improve the number of leads that you're converting each month? Because because our website is fully in greed with with the LS and it's built for s c o UM and lead generation. Mind, so our digital ied team makes sure that our websites are consistent with Google's algorithm. Uh. And that's gonna boost your rankings. Um, and that's ultimately gonna drive more traffic to your website. Would you be interested in learning a little bit more? All right, let's stop there, Charles. How that feel uh a bit nervous? Um? Yeah, but yeah, nervous role players are harder than real calls in my opinion anyway. Um So again, Uh, I'm gonna turn the mic over to Jason. Y'all hear my feedback every week. Let's see what Jason has for some feedback, probably some questions, and see if we can tune this up a little bit. Is that how a typical call might go to Charles? Is there anything different that comes up when you're when you're making these calls? I will say so, Um, I just started this company a few weeks ago. Um Okay, prior to I was actually calling warm weeds, so it wasn't a cold call. Um, So I don't have my sample is too small to say, but I will I will say just um, I'm gonna incorporate I think you call it priority dropping into into the script because I noticed that I'll start talking to people I feel like I was rambling and they're just like, I gotta go and just kind of get off the phone. So I think is asking that question, it's it's it's a binary answers, yes or no if you're interested or not. So you know, trying this out. I haven't done it yet, but I would say that the experience I've had so far. Most people are just kind of like, you know, who are you? Yeah, and then I gotta go on my interested in kind of hanging the phone. Yeah. So yeah, So let's let's unpack this a bit. So the intro. The first thing that I would do, Let's reduce the friction of having a conversation with you. Five minutes feels like an eternity to me. Don't ask for five minutes, ask for a minute, ask for thirty seconds, right, So just reduce like the the effort that this person has to put in. Hey, Charles is Jason with x y Z company. You got a minute for me to tell you the reason for my call. You can let me know if you keep chatting, So you can just start simple like that permission based opener. The next thing that you said. I love that you said, Hey, I noticed you have a Kpe COREP website. Okay, what I...

...want you to talk about here before you go into the priority drop is any time anyone here that has a tool that combines multiple tools into one. If someone's not using a tool like that, they are to use a phrase that Belala TROI, one of my my friends in the space he uses cobbling together. So I'm gonna say, hey, Charles, if you're like a lot of the real estate agents that we work with around the United States or Canada or whatever, North America, whatever you want to say, um or hey, if you're like a lot of the Keller Williams agents that we currently support, you might be cobbling together multiple tools like your KP core website, your CRM in another place, and then running ads on Facebook and Google AdWords. This not about like what you're doing. Just get some confirmation there. Yeah. Well, the reason I was giving you a called, Charles, is that in the real estate agents that we speak to, what they're trying to do is and that's your priority drop. They're trying to get more qualified leads to come into their website or convert more of those leads or whatever it might be, right or Hey, they're running a big team and they need to make sure that these folks have a lot of leads in on these websites. Since it's disconnected from everything else, they don't really know like how much traffic they're getting, how effective it is at qualifying. And what we found is that when we can get all these tools in one place like we've done for X y Z agents, it tends to produce this outcome. I'm really curious right now, like I want to ask some questions around things that they're not able to do. And that's the hook part of the call that we didn't really get a chance to talk to a lot about today. But at the beginning, I want you to permission based, opener, ask for less time, and then I want you to get into this cobbling together tools like you need to start the conversation there and started a little higher and speaking with real estate agents like you. They're trying to accomplish X y Z, but typically they're cobbling together multiple tools like the key v website that I saw, the social media ads I saw you're running, etcetera. That's sound about right, and then going to your priorities from there, okay, and it's it's it's it's amazing that you might already have this insight around or this information around the website they're using. Right, you're I'm on your website now it looks like you're using such and such. That's your that's your uh pattern interrupt that Jason talked about in the beginning, you start with there before even and then by the way, my name is Charles, I'm with such and such. You have a minute, so you can even start there with that information that shows that I'm sitting on your rubsit right now. I'm just I'm not just calling down a list of real estate agents in the country. I'm actually on your website right now and it looks like this is what you're using. By the way, my name is Charles. Do you have a minute, and then then you can transition into that priority drop um great opportunity to try to test out some of the things that Jason shared today. So Charles, thank you so much for being a volunteer here. Hopefully you got a little bit of nuggets. Uh. And we're gonna open up for the que and we only have about twelve minutes left, so I don't want to open up with the Q and A for the rest of the group, but thanks for all right. So we only have like twelve minutes left. I do want to open up for live Q and A. It looks like JP if you come around next time, you can join. We've got to start to stop repeat in two weeks and we'll have another show guest on. But I don' want to open up for Q and A because it seems to be like a lot of questions coming in, and with Jason's knowledge, I'd love to get um those questions answered. What tonality do you use in the opener? And what pace? I feel like more energetic and sales, I say on the worst it is, Yeah, it's probably right right here we go. What do you thought I think with the tonality? I I uh, I think that people overthink this a lot and they try to sound a certain way. So don't try to sound any kind of way first, like start trying to start from a pretty neutral baseline. Don't be super excited to talk to this person because you don't even know who they are. You've never even met this person. So I just try to come in and just very neutral neutral. I think...

...the thing that you want to do is really slow down though you probably want to talk about half as fast as you think that you should talk. I don't know about you, Ryan, I still every call I make my heart racist as that phones. You know, I have an Apple Watch now I should probably just look at the heart rate, you know, I know it goes up with it. I can feel my heart beating you know, so we know when someone answers. Yeah, one of the things you can do as the phone is ringing, just make sure to get a deep breath in. Do you make sure you're breathing. I tend to in situations like this or on calls, get short of breath because I'm not breathing because my heart rate is elevated, and I tend to talk faster. So that would be the first thing is just be really mindful of the pace that you're talking. Hey, Ryan, it's jacent with outbound squad. You got a minute for me to tell you why I'm calling, and then you can let me know if you want to keep chatting. I'm gonna come in really neutral. I'm not gonna have upward inflections. I'm not gonna really do a lot of downward and like, just pretty neutral and really I want to enunce the eight that's the biggest thing. Hey, it's Jason. I know you weren't expecting my call. Do you have a minute for me to tell you why I'm calling, then you can let me know if you want to keep chatting. I want to really focus on enunciating the words. This goes back to the door to door days when I was selling house painting services. Person opens the door and it's like, hey, I'm with X y Z company and I came by your house because we're gonna be painting homes in your neighborhood this summer. Like painting, we really enuncy because people are just like it's like Charlie Brown kind of situation. It's just like a lot of noise. Come like, really enunciate. So if I have any tips for tonality, talk about us half as fast as you think that you should talk, and really enunciate the words in your opener, and and practice practice, practice. I think you might have said this, might have seen you or someone else. But the first part of the call, like your openers, should be really scripted. Should be really, very very scripted. It should be like the same exact thing every a single time you call someone like that. It should be extremely scripted. So I don't want to have to think about what I'm saying in the first part of the call. That's right, write it down and and and practice the heck out of it. And for Jason's response, everyone that's been here before, it's spot onto what I'd recommend. It's gonna feel weird at first, but try to talk almost at half pace, and that's gonna really help you get through that intro. Calm down, get through that intro, and you will start to get signals on should you speed up, should you get a little bit more hyped, or should you even slow down further? A little more energy, a little less energy. All of those things will come out as the conversation begins. Remember, this is interruptive communication, just like in the door to door when so openses this person here to rob me? Or what is this all about? It's the same thing. Is this is this a scam call? Like? What is is this an emergency? I won't Charlie Brown is perfect. I gonna start giving you credit for that. Won want Jason says, the war want. But Charlie Brown, that's what's happening. They're not hearing you, So you've got to find a way to help them understand who the heck you are, why you're calling, and all the things that we share today. But it does start around pace, probably more than anything else. Pace is very, very important, and then tonality will change based on the prospect. You know, that's when the mirroring should come in a bit. Uh and there's upticks and downticks, but enunciation is is really important too. And as you're scripting your your your intro, make sure that it is you to your point, Like, don't try to sound a kind of way as Jason said, like that that that's really important. If it's not natural, it's gonna sound like a robot. It's not going to come off normal, and you're not gonna get past he low, you know. And so if you're if you're looking at the data and you're in that average of eighty seconds or less, you're you're probably having some problems here, and try to try to slow down and that will actually help you get through more of those conversations into the the actual intent or purpose of the great question. I got one more actually just quick thing to add to...

...that. Smile. This is a personal preference. Uh, like what we had in call centers. We'd have a little pocket mirror up on the cubicle and the goal is to see your teeth while you're talking. You know, I want the prospect to see my dimples through the phone, you know what I mean. So, like, smile, if that's your style, that can be super helpful too. I want to be really hard to say no to you. It's kind of hard in person. If someone approaches you really nicely and has a big smile on their face, it's kind of hard to be an asshole to that person, you know what I mean? So like make it really hard to be mean to you or to say no to you. That's that's kind of the kind of the idea here. Yeah, that's not a bad that's a bad mindset, all right, Next one, can you put it in an email for me? What's the best way to get around this? Yeah, So objections, I think through a three part framework. It's empathize, validate, offer. So before you handle the objection, just acknowledge what you what you heard. So, oh, hey, sounds like you want to get a better idea of what this is before you commit to a meeting, No problem, I'm happy to send you an email. But before I do that, I'm really curious, is this going to be something that you're gonna be looking at. It's gonna be something you're gonna want to afford to your team. Get an idea of who's going to be sent to you, and then I'm just gonna ask a couple of questions there to figure out like what I could put in that email? Hey, Ryan, you mentioned that reducing costs of serve was a focus for you. Um, is there anything specific that you want to see around how other companies are using digital assets to reduce the cost of serve and get people to call less into the contact center? Yeah? Yeah, we're looking to do this. Well, see if you can do some light questioning there and get a few tidbits from the prospect and then your circle back and just ask for the meeting one more time. So Ryan, can I make a crazy suggestion? Yeah? What's up? All of those things are exactly challenges that we've heard from companies like A and B. Would it be a terrible idea if we just said, as I ten or fifteen minutes, I could run you through some of those stuff. Sure, some of the insights and AFT at that point you don't want to talk to me anymore, totally fair, But I think there's really something here for you. Do you have your calendaring Indie, I'm gonna go in and ask for the meeting again. We all know here. We've been doing this long enough to know that when someone says can you send me an email? And you send them the perfect email. The response rate is like near zero on that. So let them know that you are willing to comply, get a few more questions in and then ask for the meeting. And so context matters around when this is coming up, right, So can you put that in an email? Did they say that in the very very beginning before you even got past hello? Or was this after you've gone through some two way dialogue, et cetera. So what Jason just shared a spot on UM and the most important thing here is to make sure you do follow up. So ask for the meeting. Even if you don't get it, still follow up getting getting that email out and then following up. Follow ups have about I don't know two or three x increase in conversion, So I wouldn't use it as an objection. There's no way around it. Sometimes it's an actual request. And so if you follow some of the tactics that UM Jason just shared, but then also make sure to follow up. And when I mean follow up, like within a day or two, that's when you're gonna see that compound effort from phone email phone payoff, even if you can't booke it on that first conversation. But everything else Jason shared a spot on UM. It does matter when they ask that question, right. If it's in the very very beginning, it's likely an objection or a brush off, and you absolutely need to get into what Jason already mentioned. Now, if you already gather some information, maybe you can just recaps, if great, some from what you've shared with me today, I will put into this this and this is That's some fair Would there be anything else you'd like to see? Is there anyone else that's going to see it? Right? That's another way to recap that. So it depends on when when that question was asked in the conversation. How do you manage prospects who keep cutting you off the...

...cool call? Yeah? Interesting, this this is to your point right earlier. Where this happens is super important. So because someone else asked, you know, if someone cuts me off and is not interested, that's the same kind of thing. If the prospect cuts me off in the very beginning of a call, there's something wrong with my intro. So try some of the stuff we talked about before. Try starting with something relevant and doing a permission based opener and allowing like get the prospect to hand you the mic that's the whole point of the permission based opener. They're handed you the mic and you can just like you have a space right there where you can explain the reason for your call. Now, if I'm getting a little bit further into the call, and you see the prospect is cutting you off, getting cut off is not always a bad thing. If the prospects engaged and they're giving you good insights, I've just gotta let them talk. But if they're cutting you off with objections, I'm always going to come from the place of how do I prevent some of these objections from happening. So the way that I prevent most of these objections is I got to come in as appear and demonstrate business acumen, and I do that through the priority drop. I speak with lots of people like you at these companies and they tell me that they're focused on these things. If you nail that part, you're going to get very few objections where it's like not interested, not right now, I'm about to step into a meeting all that kind of stuff. If you nail that part, you still might get the we already have a solution for this, and you know, all those kind of stuff but if someone keeps cut cutting you off, I think it depends on what they're cutting you off with. If you're getting information from them, let them talk. And if you're getting caught off at the beginning, make sure you're applying the principles that we talked about earlier today. Yeah, spot on. Sometimes it might be targeting as well, So you know, if you're getting cut off and you are, you know, it's not relevant you're getting shut down, you may want to rethink who you're selling into. Uh. If everything else that has been shared, it's like, man, it feels like, you know, when I speak with certain people it's working, but other people it's not. I mean, look at the actual people and and and that's where you can start to do some stuff in the beginning where you drop um in that relevance piece that Jason shared, I'm speaking with specific titles like sales development leaders, if that was an example. And sometimes titles are a little bit obscured, So I mean sales development leaders is a little bit different. Customer support leaders would be a little bit different. Like someone might have like a customers support director of customer support, and you think that that's a director of customer support but you call them and you're like, hey, I speak with customer support leaders and like I'm not a leader, I'm actually just a rep. Well, that might be the reason why you're getting cut off is it's not going to be relevant for them. They don't they don't really deal with any of this stuff. So so also think about list two, UM, and that's where data is going to drive a lot of these potential challenges that are coming up. It's sometimes it's not just what you're saying, it's also who you're saying it to. UM, So keep keep aware of the target message component when you're thinking about that. All right, we probably have time, we do not. That was the last question. Twenty second stuff Jason, Thank you so much for blessing us with your presence. You drop some knowledge today if folks want to reach out to you, I know you already shared a link, which is awesome, but how can people reach out to learn a little bit more about what you're doing and how you're helping others like everyone today? Yeah, connect with me on LinkedIn. I post content every day on outbound and and selling and then outbound squad dot com would be a good place. So if you're a rep and you're an str I looking to become an a E or maybe an eight E that's in your first couple of years and looking to just really build confidence in the foundation of sales skills, you're gonna find lots of great content there. And then if you're a company or sales leader sales team that wants your team to do some of the stuff that we talked about today, we've programs like that as well. So reach out to me on LinkedIn or at outbound squad dot com, which I dropped into the Lincoln would love to help you out, whether that's with free staff or let you know about our courses and programs and that sort of stuff. So right and the Cognizant group appreciate, appreciate you having me on man. Yeah, thanks man, this is awesome and we'll see you all in two weeks for another start stop repeat. So if you like to volunteer, make sure to get with Tim sooner...

...rather than later so you can bump your way up to the beginning of the line.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (76)